FCGH meets License to Heal

License to HealAn interesting initiative from the Netherlands has come to our attention. It’s called License to Heal, and its manifesto touches upon many key elements of the Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH), the proposed international treaty presently gathering support across a wide array of civil society organizations. Both License to Heal and the FCGH see having a legal framework to assure universal access to medicines as imperative, and as a ‘do-able’ challenge. It would seem that these two NGOs should meet, share, and agree to collaborate — for access to medicines for all.

Below is some information from the License to Heal website. It’s worth having a visit. They also can be followed on twitter,  although reading some Dutch may be useful.
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“We need to design a sustainable business model to ensure medication is available for all, for a fair price!”. This is a statement from the manifesto License to Heal that is written by eight political youth parties in the Netherlands.

Together they ask their national government to make legislation that directs pharmaceutical companies to be transparent about their prices and determine their prices conform a limited profit margin. A wonderful initiative in which the political youth parties showed leadership by setting aside their political differences and come to a shared vision on this important topic.

The cooperating Political Youth Organisations are convinced that drugs and other medical products should be accessible to everyone. We feel supported in this matter by several international treaties, in which the universal right to health has been recorded. To realise general accessibility, all stakeholders in the development of medicine need to take their social responsibility. Since stakeholders cannot or will not take this responsibility in the current system, the government needs to set a framework.

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All Aboard Needs Your Opinion

All Aboard Needs Your OpinionSometimes, an opinion can make a difference. This is one of those times.

The human right and principle of participation states that people, particularly those clearly affected (yet usually excluded), must be involved in institutional decisions that have an impact on them, including in the design, development, implementation and monitoring of the programmes that are needed.

When the right to participation is applied to health, with hundreds of millions of people whose lives may depend on these decisions and policies, their views and ‘voices’ must be through a system of representation that is equitable and responsive to their needs.

In global health governance, it appears that those most at risk of being ‘left behind’, are also being left out — excluded from participating in decisions about them. So late last year, the IMAXI Cooperative began a new and needed initiative — All Aboard!

‘All Aboard’ is a two step research and development project that will first assess the state of affected community participation in decision-making bodies within key institutions in global health, including the United Nations (WHO, UNAIDS, UNDP, UNICEF, UN Women) and two major foundations, the Global Fund and Gates. The second step is to apply this knowledge to the programmatic advance of meaningful participation and accountable representation. First the scientific research, then the evidence-based development.

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