Sign-On: Letter to Dr. Tedros

Tedros towards FCGHThere is a new Director General at the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. During the recent WHO election process, Dr. Tedros had often mentioned that helping the poor and marginalised is his primary concern, and that adequate health care for all is essential.

There is also a new NGO in formation, the FCGH Alliance, dedicated to advancing the development of an international treaty based on the right to health, the Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH).

Below is a letter to Dr. Tedros requesting his support to advance this proposed global treaty, which would make it legally-binding on governments to assure that everyone’s right to health is realised, sooner rather than later. If you agree with the letter, please add your name and/or civil society organization to the list of signatures by clicking here. Help us to inform Dr. Tedros that a broad  group of people from civil society want real (legally-binding) change – not just nice sound-bites about those already left out and behind.
Thanks in advance.

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Dear Director-General Tedros,

Congratulations on your appointment to be the next WHO Director-General. As you assume the sacred global trust as head of the World Health Organization, no doubt you feel the mighty responsibility of your office, with its tremendous potential for bringing better health to the world’s people – and above all, to the poor, marginalized, left behind, discriminated against – people to whom you have long voiced great commitment. We were heartened to hear you state so powerfully upon your appointment that WHO must “put the right to health at the core of its functions, and be the global vanguard to champion them.”

One powerful tool to do just that is a proposed Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH), which would be a global treaty based on the right to health and aimed at national and global health equity. It could help put the right to health not only at the core of WHO’s functions, but also at the core of the global policy agenda. We call upon you to use your legal and moral authority to initiate a WHO process towards this treaty, with its transformative promise.

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FCGH meets License to Heal

License to HealAn interesting initiative from the Netherlands has come to our attention. It’s called License to Heal, and its manifesto touches upon many key elements of the Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH), the proposed international treaty presently gathering support across a wide array of civil society organizations. Both License to Heal and the FCGH see having a legal framework to assure universal access to medicines as imperative, and as a ‘do-able’ challenge. It would seem that these two NGOs should meet, share, and agree to collaborate — for access to medicines for all.

Below is some information from the License to Heal website. It’s worth having a visit. They also can be followed on twitter,  although reading some Dutch may be useful.
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“We need to design a sustainable business model to ensure medication is available for all, for a fair price!”. This is a statement from the manifesto License to Heal that is written by eight political youth parties in the Netherlands.

Together they ask their national government to make legislation that directs pharmaceutical companies to be transparent about their prices and determine their prices conform a limited profit margin. A wonderful initiative in which the political youth parties showed leadership by setting aside their political differences and come to a shared vision on this important topic.

The cooperating Political Youth Organisations are convinced that drugs and other medical products should be accessible to everyone. We feel supported in this matter by several international treaties, in which the universal right to health has been recorded. To realise general accessibility, all stakeholders in the development of medicine need to take their social responsibility. Since stakeholders cannot or will not take this responsibility in the current system, the government needs to set a framework.

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