Denunciatory Thoughts

future_quote_203pxFood for a denunciatory thought
Human Rights Reader 385

THE BREAKAWAY WEALTH OF THE 1% IS PROOF THAT WE DO NOT HAVE A CRISIS OF SCARCITY, BUT A DEFICIT OF FAIRNESS AND OF HUMAN RIGHTS. (Ron Labonte)

With a few fast clicks of the mouse on a computer in a beautiful air-conditioned office, in a few seconds, a small number of persons can (and do) deprive several million human beings of the basis of their existence, their livelihood and their human rights. Accepting this as collateral damage is against all ethics; it is criminal. (Jean-Claude Juncker)

The powerful exploit enormous advantages

For those in power, the money they amass is never enough; with all the notoriety and success it can buy them, it also becomes the cause of their downfall… for having become too rich. (Leonardo Padura Fuentes)

1. The powerful can and do skillfully game the system quite systematically skewing the flow of resources towards those who already have much more than their fair share. (i) Obviously, this art of deception is not linked to a lack of trying, but to a lack of scruples. (F. Manes) In fact, every day, the macroeconomic figures deceptively made public have become the best way to hide social and human rights (HR) realities and are thus becoming less and less realistic. (Roberto Savio)

Let us face it: Economic theory is, by far, not the politically most relevant branch of science …and GDP does NOT reflect inequalities in society. As deplorable is the excessive ‘mathematization’ of economics since the 1970s. Assuming the neutrality of ‘rational’ economic mathematical models is not only gratuitous, but a fallacy.
(i): Our curse actually comes from Adam Smith who reasoned: “I am inherently self-interested –I am human”.

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Rights Reality Check (3)

Now, more than ever…rights_reality_check_III_px203

For years we have heard the right words coming from the United Nations, including its agencies WHO, UNDP, ILO, OHCHR, UNAIDS, UNICEF and others. Words that get repeated in speeches and written into important policies to guide governments to build a better life for all. Many of these key words relate to the pillars of human rights, such as participation, accountability, empowerment, transparency, equality and non-discrimination. Some are the basis for sound-bite sized slogans: “Leave no one behind” is the currently ‘top of the talk’ for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Unfortunately, for those most in need down in the communities, these words are often just empty promises and reminders of the gap of credibility between the high level decision-makers and those affected by their decisions on the ground.

For the UN agencies and governments to be true to their words, they must be held to account by the people in these communities. This is a key element of human rights. The ‘Global Goals’ (also known as the SDGs), as all other development programmes originating in the UN system, should follow the Human Rights-Based Approach (HRBA)), signed by all of the UN agencies in what they called the ‘Common Understanding’ in 2003. The HRBA is the agreed standard for best practices for all programmes related to economic, social and cultural development.

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